City seeks vols. for new cat control program

Miamisburg, Ohio – Nov. 16, 2016:  Due to recent modifications to the City of Miamisburg’s animal ordinance and administrative policies regarding stray and feral cat issues, the City is seeking volunteers to help implement a functional trap-neuter-return (TNR) program in conjunction with the Humane Society of Greater Dayton.

The City recently signed an agreement with the Humane Society in which that organization will provide neuter/spay and return services for $35 per cat for community cats.  However, assistance is needed in the areas of trapping and transporting the cats to a facility on Nicholas Road in Dayton during pre-determined days and times.  This process will require volunteers who are capable of setting and checking traps and transporting captured cats to the Humane Society’s shelter. The Humane Society will then fix, vaccinate (rabies and CVR-CP) and eartip the cats before returning them to the location(s) where they were caught, with the City covering the cost of the procedures.

By returning the fixed cats to the area(s) where they are captured, the territorial nature of the animal decreases the odds that other, unfixed cats will enter the area and contribute to nuisance issues.

“The intent of this program is to reduce the likelihood that stray and feral cats become nuisances for the areas where they live,” City Planner Ryan Homsi said.  “Once fixed, many of the nuisance issues (excessive roaming, spraying, fighting, howling, etc.) associated with stray and feral cats decrease in occurrence. The cats also become tamer. Ultimately, if enough of the animals are caught and fixed, the stray and feral cat population will stabilize and begin to decline through attrition.”

More socialized grown cats may be adopted out, if room is available at the Humane Society’s shelter.  Kittens may be moved into the fostering program until they are ready for adoption.  In addition, the Humane Society has a “barn cat” adoption program, where less socialized cats can be adopted by those in more rural areas looking for barn cats to help control rodent issues on farms.  In this case, the cats benefit by being provided shelter in a barn or barn-like structure.

For those interesting in gaining experience working with animals, including trapping and transporting stray or feral cats, volunteer opportunities are available with the Humane Society.

Animal ordinance revised

Along with this new agreement, the City has updated its animal ordinance to clarify the definition of an “owner” (and, thus, responsible for their actions) of an animal and what situations constitute a “public nuisance.”  Under this revised ordinance, people become the owner of an animal, by default, if they provide food and/or water on a regular basis. In order to combat and prevent the creation of future issue areas, a ban on reckless outdoor feeding of animals has also been approved, which includes situations where such an amount of food is left outdoors so as to attract an excessive number of stray and feral cats, as well as other animals (raccoons, skunks, etc.), onto the feeder’s property and the properties of their neighbors.

“The intent of this change is not to deprive stray and feral cats of food,” Homsi said.  “The intent is to curtail and prevent the creation of new feral cat colonies.  Such colonies create health and safety issues for the surrounding neighborhood and cause nuisance issues for neighboring property owners.”

While this program will take time to implement, TNR programs have been shown to be the most humane and effective long-term strategy for reducing stray and feral cat populations, while also reducing nuisance complaints.

Citizens who have questions or would like to become a volunteer may contact Homsi at 847-6536 or This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

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